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Welcome to Health & Safety Nottingham, the website of GD Associates (Nottingham) Ltd.

We are a local business that provide cost effective solutions and advice to businesses regarding their Health, Safety and Quality Systems requirements. We undertake one-off consultation contracts and retainer work.

In short, we’re here to help make your workplace and business as safe as it can be and ensure you meet all legal requirements. Please browse our website and get in touch to find out how we can help.

07947802209

“We will provide a service tailored to your individual requirements”

Garry Douglas – Managing Director

H&S Bulletins
Staysafe Bulletin January 2020/01

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

The EH40/2005 Workplace exposure limits contains the list of workplace exposure limits for use with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (as amended)

The 2020 edition replaces the previous version as published in 2018. The new edition takes account of the new and amended occupational workplace exposure limits, (WEL’s). These came in to force January 2020

Details of the changes that came into force on 17 January 2020 can be summarised as follows:

There were new or revised entries for the following substances:

Hardwood dusts (including mixed dusts)
Chromium (VI) compounds
Refractory ceramic fibres
Respirable crystalline silica
Vinyl chloride monomer
Ethylene oxide
1,2-Epoxypropane
Acrylamide
2-Nitropropane
O-Toluidine
1,3-Butadiene
Hydrazine
Bromoethylene

New skin notations have been added for the following substances:

Ethylene oxide

The following substances required reductions to the existing WELs:

Hardwood dusts
Chromium (VI) compounds
Refractory ceramic fibres
Vinyl chloride monomer
Ethylene oxide
1,2-Epoxypropane
Acrylamide
2-Nitropropane
O-Toluidine
1,3-Butadiene
Hydrazine

This latest version of EH40/2005 ‘Workplace exposure limits’ has been updated to include the new and revised workplace exposure limits (WELs) as introduced by the Carcinogens and Mutagens Directive (EU) 2017/2398 amending Directive (2004/37/EC) and can be downloaded free from the HSE website: here.

Source: HSE website

Health & Safety Statistics:
Key figures for Great Britain (2018/19)

1.4 million working people suffering from a work-related illness
2,526 mesothelioma deaths due to past asbestos exposures (2017)
147 workers killed at work
581,000 working people sustaining an injury at work according to the Labour Force Survey
69,208 injuries to employees reported under RIDDOR
28.2 million working days lost due to work-related illness and workplace injury
£15 billion estimated cost of injuries and ill health from current working conditions (2017/18)

Further information can be found on the HSE website: Here.

Source: HSE website

Just 1 in 5 Monitors Asthma Risk Health Surveillance

RR1139: Uptake and quality of health surveillance for occupational asthma in the woodworking, baking and motor vehicle repair sectors presents research into the levels of uptake and quality of health surveillance for occupational asthma in three industry sectors at increased risk of occupational asthma: woodworking; baking; and motor vehicle repair. 
Telephone interviews were held with employers from 457 organisations, of which 67% reported carrying out risk assessments. Risk of exposures that might cause occupational asthma (in the view of the duty holder) was reported in 42 (27%) motor vehicle repair enterprises, in 78 (52%) woodworking workplaces and in 95 (62%) bakeries.
Equivalent statistics for the specific industry sectors under consideration were 14% for the woodworking sector, 17% for motor vehicle repair sector and 24% for the bakery sector. 
Reporting by the organisations surveyed showed that health surveillance was more commonly carried out in medium/large enterprises (74%) than in micro enterprises (7%). About a third delivered health surveillance in-house and two thirds used an external provider.
The research revealed that some duty holders who were not providing health surveillance thought that they had no obligation to provide health surveillance, did not need to provide it because they were very small organisations or regarded the cost as a burden.
Source: IOSH Magazine

Comment
Health Surveillance plays an important role in helping to confirm that control measures implemented are working when protecting workers against occupational health problems. This is a legal requirement in many situations.
Although ‘engineering’ solutions should be considered first when protecting workers against occupational health hazards, suitable health surveillance should be considered when undertaking risk assessments.

February 7, 2020 by Garry Douglas